Multi-disiplinary Design

Sustainable Responsible design thinking & practice

Design like art, is not easily categorised, is multi-disciplined and when it follows Responsible Design thinking and practice is of great currency, practicality and often stretches the boundaries of what’s possible. This page brings together related areas that are covered in more depth by the individual discipline pages. Design can challenge, inspire and educate in many ways especially if you look beyond the surface.

Designers (and consumers), face the challenge of considering the full impact of the buildings, products and processes they use and all they create. Responsibility extends well beyond the time a product is used and includes it’s full life cycle and even whole system thinking to consider all aspects such as appropriate and minimum materials, recyclability, decomposition and toxicity. It also extends to; is the product useful, does it fulfill a real need, is it robust and durable, easy to repair or disassemble for repurposing? It’s also a responsibility of interest for consumers who are now much more environmentally aware of the real cost of current wasteful and toxic production and are demanding better solutions. Most processes have many flow on effects, whether perfectly efficient or totally toxic the decisions are yours to choose and influence. Below are ideas to develop this thinking responsibly.

Sustainia ideas

Use your “uncommon” common sense to combine responsible design thinking and business planning to global issues. Sustainia has many options to review with their global opportunity explorer.

Sustainia ideas

Integral to any good design is appropriate Material Selection. Materia is the global network in the area of innovative materials. Materia encourages joint innovation on the road to a more beautiful, sustainable and high-quality built environment. materia.nl & Channel Selection : materia.nl/channel/   Also review Matrec www.matrec.com/en/trends

Tilted, zero energy house, Norway

Wikipedia Circular Economy encompasses more than the production and consumption of goods and services, including a shift from fossil fuels to renewable energy, and the role of diversity as a characteristic of resilient and productive systems. It includes discussion of the role of money, finance and the perpetual growth myth as part of the wider debate. See Circular Design Guide and publications/circular-by-design EMF CE pages

The Circular Design Guides says:  “The scale of what we’re designing has shifted from products, to companies, to economic systems. Who we’re designing for has expanded from a solitary user to an intimately connected web of people, spanning the globe. New tools such as artificial intelligence, the internet of things, and biomimicry mean our design ambitions are limited only by our imagination. Meanwhile, creativity has never been more important: the global economy is stuttering and disruptive technologies challenge established business models.”

Tilted, zero energy house. In a continued effort to produce ecologically conscious structures, the research center on zero emission buildings and design office Snohetta developed this pilot house. The dwelling also serves as a platform for assisting knowledge of ‘plus houses’, which produce more energy than they use. via designboom web :: Norway / Global relevance.

Tilted, zero energy house, Norway

Loads of information can be found throughout this site for Ideas, ExhibitionsPeople, Connections, News and more. It was designed to explore!

Transition Design is design research, practice and study that began in 2012 and integrated into 2014 programs. It’s presented here as an open source concept and an invitation for engagement and co-evolution with educators, researchers and practitioners from design and related disciplines. (Pic 1)

Below pics show the incredible value and breadth of ideas in projects from across 8 years (so far) of SRD Change. Each reveals different aspects of responsible design thinking. C11 Sam Cowley, Zero Carbon Centre concept (and many more) at SRD Change National  (Pic 2)

Considering the full impact of the buildings, products and processes they use is also a responsibility for consumers who are now much more environmentally aware of the real cost of current wasteful and toxic production and are demanding better solutions. Examples of Good Design Thinking are at SRD Change exhibitions (Pic 3)

Most processes have many flow on effects, whether perfectly efficient or totally toxic the decisions are yours to choose and influence. Pics below of SRD Change reveals different aspects of responsible design thinking. C11 Rhys Tucker, Cot to Coffin multi-purpose furniture piece (many more) at SRD Change National (Pic 4)

Transition Design concept
Zero Carbon Centre concept: Sam Cowley c11
Rhys Tucker design Cot to coffin pic C11

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